"It's a bit of an eye-opener, really. When you're my age, you've got five daughters and a house in Spain, you think everything is sorted. And then you find out your wife has been stealing from you and cheating on you and suddenly you've got nowhere to go. I had to start all over again."

Jim* stayed in our 2019 night shelter for a few weeks until we helped him move into a social home in Princes Risborough.

If you are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless, please drop into our Support Centre on 8 Castle Street between 10am and 12:30pm on any working day and we will do all we can to help you.

Please click here to volunteer for our 2020 winter night shelter.

I lost my first wife to breast cancer. I say she's a silly bugger for catching it because, if I weren’t flippant about it, I'd cry. Her mate was having a mammogram and she went for moral support. When the nurse asked if she wanted a go, they found a lump. She had chemotherapy and radiotherapy but a year later they found cancer in the lymph gland. I grieved for years and swore never to have another relationship, but like a typical man I fell in love with my second wife.

We met in a pub and chatted and chatted and chatted. We got married in Gibraltar. I say it was the second best thing I've ever done because, although it was fun, I miss my first wife.

I still don’t know why she did it. I actually asked her once, but she couldn't give me an answer. She was financially secure; she had clothes and a car. He's ten years older than me and she's ten years younger than me. Thank God I'm not a drinker cos it would've driven me to drink. She's the one who's lost out, though. We had six kids and eight grandkids. But they won't talk to her now.

I'm 72 this year, and I’ve lived abroad for most of my life. I've got a doctorate in avionics, a degree in mathematics and a degree in physics. I had a very good job as an aerospace engineer with Rolls Royce. I was on £120,000 a year and saved money, never wasted it.

When I retired, I started what became a very successful business. We had seven vans a great big warehouse. But I didn't keep a very good account of the money; everything was exchanged in cash. If I'd done a 10,000 sale I should have 5,000 in my account and 5,000 in cash. But only 3,000 would get paid into my account. And I never sussed it cos I always had money in my pocket.

I got the call from my accountant. She could see some money missing - in the region of £100,000. I was absolutely bewildered. My bank manager put me in touch with a solicitor, meanwhile I found out my wife was going behind my back with another man. She's still with him now.

I wasn't expecting her to steal or cheat on me. Although she was ultimately prosecuted for fraud, for a time I had nowhere to go. That's when I knocked on the door of Wycombe Homeless Connection.

I stayed in the shelter for a time. It was very well run, very professional. Every day, the beds were made with lovely clean sheets. Anything you asked for politely you got. In the morning, you’d get up, make your bed and fold your sheets. I met some wonderful people. The volunteers at night were great; we’d have a laugh, and they had the patience of the lord when they took the manners of some of the guests. I can’t stand rude people.

WHC is wonderful. Kevin helped me out a lot and all the staff were very kind. The support workers told me that, because of my age, the council had a legal duty to house me and - with their help - I only waited a few weeks before hopping on a bus to view a place in Princes Risborough. I’ll have that, I thought. I never even went inside; I just looked at the house from the road. But I told them it was perfect.

It's a bit of an eye-opener, really. When you're my age, you've got five daughters and a house in Spain, you think everything is sorted. And then you find out your wife has been stealing from you and cheating on you and suddenly you've got nowhere to go. I had to start all over again.

I've got a wonderful life now. I've got a lovely house and the only people who come round are those I want to see. I have some of the lads from the shelter over for dinner sometimes. Every six months I get my prostate checked; if there's another twenty years in it, I'll be happy.

I never thought I’d be in that position. But it’s nice to know you’ve got people to help you when you’re in the sh*t.

*Jim's name has been changed for anonymity.

If you are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless, please drop into our Support Centre on 8 Castle Street between 10am and 12:30pm on any working day and we will do all we can to help you.

Please click here to volunteer for our 2020 winter night shelter.